Nature

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Almost on the cusp of the Mariana Trench, before it plunges down into the very bowels of the ocean, scientists have found something rare and wonderful. Sometime in 2015, an underwater volcano experienced a massive eruption, spewing molten magma into the surrounding ocean.   As the incredibly hot magma meets the water, it begins to
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Strange-looking black pouches have been washing up on beaches along North Carolina’s shores. But despite how they might look, they’re not plastic pollution, as officials have reminded the well-meaning public.   That’s because they’re actually something much cooler – the egg casings of sea skates. Sometimes known as mermaid’s or devil’s purses, based on their
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Amazon welcomed visitors into its headquarters over the weekend to see a rare corpse flower named Morticia in bloom. The 6-foot-tall (182-centimetre-tall) plant, which is technically called a “titan arum”, sits in the rainforest inside of the Spheres on Amazon’s Seattle campus.   The Spheres opened earlier this year, and they’re intended to serve as
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The Jurassic seas were a formidable place – home to sharks, crocodiles, sea monsters, and, apparently, piranha-like, flesh-eating fish. A nearly-complete fossil of a ray-finned bony fish with extra sharp teeth has scientists thinking they’ve found the piranha’s Jurassic equivalent.   If they’re right, this would be the oldest evidence of a flesh-eating bony fish
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Trying to imagine what dinosaurs actually looked like 66 million years ago is no easy task – it involves some painstakingly detailed fossil analysis, some intelligent guesswork, and a bit of creative imagination.   As scientific methods develop and new research is published though, our concepts of dinosaur appearances are getting better over time. Now
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Stinging trees grow in rainforests throughout Queensland and northern New South Wales in Australia. The most commonly known (and most painful) species is Dendrocnide moroides (Family Urticaceae), first named “gympie bush” by gold miners near the town of Gympie in the 1860s.   My first sting was from a different species Dendrocnide photinophylla (the shiny-leaf
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An international team of scientists has discovered evidence of common bacteria living so far underground and away from sunlight that we may have to re-evaluate the habitability of deep subsurface ecosystems – including those of alien worlds.   There’s a deep terrestrial environment – sometimes called the ‘dark biosphere’ – that extends hundreds of metres