Month: February 2019

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It was the most explosive scientific controversy of 2018: Chinese scientist He Jiankui brazenly announced in November he had created the world’s first gene-edited babies using CRISPR.   He’s admission – including that twin girls called Lulu and Nana from his experiment had already been born – provoked immediate international uproar in the scientific community, with
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Facebook’s treatment of its legions of content moderators is under scrutiny after the publication of a report alleging tough working conditions and low pay that saw some employees break down under the weight of the content they were reviewing.   On Monday, The Verge’s Casey Newton published an extensive investigation into a content-moderation workplace in Arizona.
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For centuries, the pyramids of Giza have puzzled researchers – not just their mysterious voids and hidden chambers, but exactly how ancient Egyptians built such impressive structures without modern technology.   One of the most confounding issues is how the structures became so perfectly aligned. Although it’s slightly lopsided, overall the square sides of the 138.8 metre
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Last week, we reported on a mysterious new website, ThisPersonDoesNotExist.com, that shows you a new human face, generated by an AI, every time you hit the refresh button. It’s a growing trend: more copycat websites like ThisAirbnbDoesNotExist.comand ThisWaifuDoesNotExist.net have also cropped up in its wake.   And now, ThisCatDoesNotExist.com takes the trend to its logical
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Damage-resistant genes. Healing powers. Very low risk of cancer. No, scientists aren’t describing Wolverine or Superman – those are the powers of the great white shark. The star of Steven Spielberg’s blockbuster, whose scientific name is Carcharodon carcharias, has a reputation as a meat-eating monster of the sea. But in fact, great white sharks may
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We humans like to put labels and boundaries on things. For example, the boundary between Earth’s atmosphere and space is the Kármán line, the point at 100 kilometres (62 miles) altitude where aeronautics end, and astronautics take over.   But Earth’s atmosphere is way more complicated than that (there’s even some debate about where the
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After several years of controversy and debate, researchers in Sweden are more convinced than ever that female Viking warriors once existed. Re-examining a contentious discovery from 2017, the researchers have again determined that the ancient Birka skeleton, found in a 10th-century Viking warrior tomb, did, in fact, belong to a biological female.   “The buried person
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Almost a century ago, British geologist and archaeologist Herbert Henry Thomas provocatively claimed he knew where Stonehenge’s famous rocks came from. While his findings and methods have since been disputed, it turns out Thomas was almost right – with new results from a painstaking eight-year excavation project finally identifying where the mysterious megaliths originated.